Tuesday, October 26News That Matters

Tag: Argentina

Dinosaurs May Have Been Socializing Nearly 200 Million Years Ago

Technology
Paleontologists have found the earliest known evidence that dinosaurs lived in herds — unlike reptiles, and more like penguins and other birds do today — and socialized with each other by age groups.The scientists, working a rich deposit of fossils at a site in Argentina’s province of Santa Cruz, at the southern tip of South America, found more than 100 eggs and the skeletons of 80 individuals ranging in age from embryos to adults.All of the fossils, including the embryos inside the eggs, are of the species Mussaurus patagonicus. These dinosaurs were about 10 feet high and 26 feet in length when fully grown, with a long tail balanced by an equally long neck that ends in a head that seems too small for the enormous animal it is attached to. This is the only place Mussaurus remains have ever...

As Western Oil Giants Cut Production, State-Owned Companies Step Up

Business
Kuwait announced last month that it planned to invest more than $6 billion in exploration over the next five years to increase production to four million barrels a day, from 2.4 million now.This month, the United Arab Emirates, a major OPEC member that produces four million barrels of oil a day, became the first Persian Gulf state to pledge to a net zero carbon emissions target by 2050. But just last year ADNOC, the U.A.E.’s national oil company, announced it was investing $122 billion in new oil and gas projects.Iraq, OPEC’s second-largest producer after Saudi Arabia, has invested heavily in recent years to boost oil output, aiming to raise production to eight million barrels a day by 2027, from five million now. The country is suffering from political turmoil, power shortages and inadequ...
An Economic Lifeline in South America, the Paraná River, Is Shriveling

An Economic Lifeline in South America, the Paraná River, Is Shriveling

Technology, World
ROSARIO, Argentina — The fisherman woke up early on a recent morning, banged on the fuel containers on his small boat to make sure he had enough for the day, and set out on the Paraná River, fishing net in hand.The outing was a waste of time. The river, an economic lifeline in South America, has shrunk significantly amid a severe drought, and the effects are damaging lives and livelihoods along its banks and well beyond.“I didn’t catch a single fish,” said the 68-year-old fisherman, Juan Carlos Garate, pointing to patches of grass sprouting where there used to be water. “Everything is dry.”The Paraná’s reduced flow, at its lowest level since the 1940s, has upended delicate ecosystems in the vast area that straddles Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay and left scores of communities scrambling fo...
El Paraná se marchita y con él, se seca un pilar económico de Sudamérica

El Paraná se marchita y con él, se seca un pilar económico de Sudamérica

Technology, World
ROSARIO, Argentina — El pescador se levantó temprano una mañana reciente, golpeó los contenedores de combustible de su pequeña embarcación para asegurarse de que tenía suficiente para el día, y salió al río Paraná, red en mano.La expedición fue una pérdida de tiempo. El río, una de las principales fuentes de ingresos de Sudamérica, se ha reducido considerablemente a causa de una grave sequía, y los efectos están dañando las vidas y los medios de subsistencia a lo largo de sus riberas y mucho más allá.“En todo el día no agarré un pescado”, dijo Juan Carlos Garate, el pescador de 68 años señalando los parches de hierba que brotan donde antes había agua. “Todo está seco”.La reducción del caudal del Paraná, que se halla en su nivel más bajo desde la década de 1940, ha trastornado los delicados...
‘We Were Left With Nothing.’ Argentina’s Misery Deepens in the Pandemic.

‘We Were Left With Nothing.’ Argentina’s Misery Deepens in the Pandemic.

Business
Before the pandemic, Carla Huanca and her family were making modest but meaningful improvements to their cramped apartment in the slums of Buenos Aires.She was working as a hairstylist. Her partner was tending bar at a nightclub. Together, they were bringing home about 25,000 pesos ($270) a week — enough to add a second story to their home, creating extra space for their three boys. They were about to plaster the walls.“Then, everything closed,” said Ms. Huanca, 33. “We were left with nothing.”Amid the lockdown, the family needed emergency handouts from the Argentine government to keep food on the table. They resigned themselves to rough walls. They shelled out for wireless internet service to allow their children to manage remote learning.“We have spent all of our savings,” Ms. Huanca sai...