Friday, January 21News That Matters

Tag: Atlanta (Ga)

Rappers Come Shop for Jewelry. Icebox Turns the Cameras On.

Rappers Come Shop for Jewelry. Icebox Turns the Cameras On.

LifeStyle
Oodles more hip-hop clients followed, many of whom found Icebox more welcoming than the city’s other jewelry options. “You think about the guy in Atlanta who comes in with a bunch of tattoos, smells a little bit like weed, has long dreads — nine out of 10 places he goes, they’re not showing him any respect,” Zahir said. “We’re here to give them respect from the moment they walk in the store.”Icebox started to become a rapper safe space and playground. Soulja Boy and Wiz Khalifa filmed themselves coming into the store for videos they posted online. In the mid-2010s, as Instagram was becoming ubiquitous as a tool of social documentation, “we started to see celebrities were posting pictures of themselves with other celebrities in Icebox,” Mo said. Every week, the store tended to several stars...

TS Madison Steals the Spotlight

LifeStyle
Nineteen minutes into the film “Zola,” the actress TS Madison delivers a devotion that becomes a kind of mantra for the rest of the film.“Dear heavenly father, we come to you thanking you today for all the bounties that you’ve bestowed upon us, Jesus,” her character, a stripper named Hollywood, recites with her head bowed and her hands linked with several dancers backstage. “We are asking for a special prayer today,” she says repeatedly.The prayer — in which she begs for God to send Black men who are cultured, have good credit (“840!”) and are well endowed — was not in the original script.“It just flowed,” Ms. Madison, 44, said in a recent Zoom interview. “It’s just like all of my energy, all of my personality, all of my self flew into it.”On the call, she summoned that spirit once again. ...
Signature Moves With Sean Bankhead

Signature Moves With Sean Bankhead

LifeStyle
Last year, when Cardi B’s team reached out to the choreographer Sean Bankhead to help create dances for the “Up” music video, he asked if she had two months to dedicate to learning them.As it happens, she did. Mr. Bankhead didn’t waste any time. The dance, with its lunges, jumps and squats, seems straight out of a high-intensity interval training class. “I pushed her, and that’s a really hard thing to learn the balance when you’re working with a high-profile celebrity like that,” he said. “You need to know how to push, but not overly push them off the cliff.”Pushing has become one of his hallmarks. Mr. Bankhead, 32, is the choreographer behind some of the year’s biggest music videos — including Lil Nas X’s “Industry Baby” and Normani’s “Wild Side” — and he is in high demand, despite the ti...
Kanye West Drew a Crowd at Donda Listening Party in Atlanta

Kanye West Drew a Crowd at Donda Listening Party in Atlanta

Travel
Though the stage was sparse, other elements of the show made it feel, like Mr. West, larger than life. Five thousand dancers, some in bullet proof vests like his, encircled the rapper. A miles-high light circling the stage beamed from its center, out of the stadium and into the sky, a telegraph to the heavens. That epic beam in the sky, visible from various parts of Atlanta, represents, to Mr. West, the protection he feels from his mother, who passed away in November 2007.Another of Mr. West’s collaborators, Mark Breitbard, global head of Gap Global, was at the show and said the whole “Donda” experience was typical Kanye. Mr. West is creating a new clothing line called Yeezy Gap with the company. “Kanye loves developing and the creative process,” he said. “This whole performance and how mu...
Chasing TikTok Dreams in the ‘New Black Hollywood’

Chasing TikTok Dreams in the ‘New Black Hollywood’

LifeStyle
‘Who Gets to Be an Influencer?’Producer/Director Lora MoftahReporter Taylor LorenzWatch on Friday, June 4, at 10 p.m. on FX and streaming on Hulu.Kaychelle wants to be on TV. Rob’s chasing a million followers and a screenplay deal. Khamyra seeks financial independence, while Tray wants to earn enough money that his mother never has to work another day in her life.To make their dreams come true, they’ve combined forces with other self-styled influencers at Collab Crib, a group house that doubles as a video studio in Atlanta, where a concentration of talent has helped attract other aspiring stars of Instagram, YouTube and TikTok.Those social platforms are where many of today’s young, ambitious creators are making their names — and fortunes. “This is more than just kids making videos on the i...
After Helping Her Husband Gain Freedom, Maya Moore Savors Her Own

After Helping Her Husband Gain Freedom, Maya Moore Savors Her Own

Sports
When you speak with Maya Moore and her husband, Jonathan Irons, a single word comes up with drumbeat constancy.Freedom.“It’s everything to us,” Moore said during an interview last week.She wasn’t talking just about the fact that Irons is out of prison after serving 23 years for a crime he always insisted he did not commit. She was talking about how, after struggling to overturn his conviction, she has more time and energy to fight for criminal justice reform.“There is life we want to live, things we want to do, things we feel called to do together to help make our world a better place,” she said. “This sense of freedom is huge for both of us now.”Here’s the shorthand version of their journey — part love story, part against-the-odds battle to right a terrible wrong. Still in the prime of a ...
A Growing Summertime Risk for Cities: Power Failures During Heat Waves

A Growing Summertime Risk for Cities: Power Failures During Heat Waves

Technology
WASHINGTON — The growing risk of overlapping heat waves and power failures poses a severe threat that major American cities are not prepared for, new research suggests.Power failures have increased by more than 60 percent since 2015, even as climate change has made heat waves worse, according to the new research published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. Using computer models to study three large U.S. cities, the authors estimated that a combined blackout and heat wave would expose at least two-thirds of residents in those cities to heat exhaustion or heat stroke.And although each of the cities in the study has dedicated public cooling centers for people who need relief from the heat, those centers could accommodate no more than 2 percent of a given city’s population,...
A Year of Cooking With My Mother

A Year of Cooking With My Mother

LifeStyle
Let the record show that I make a terrible roommate. I can still hear my mother’s voice as she encountered the sink full of dishes, the counter spilling over with spices and syrups: “I can’t live like this!”About nine months ago, I moved back home to Atlanta to write a cookbook with my mother, Jean. A couch-surfing freeloader, I was only supposed to be there for a couple of months to work on the kimchi chapter, a selection of heirloom recipes I would never have been able to develop over the phone from New York, where I live now. But as each month passed, I found more and more excuses to stay.By cooking with Jean in such a structured, quotidian way, I was able to stop time, a compelling state for an anxious mind like mine. I could finally slow down and ask her questions about the foods we a...
M.L.B. Pulls All-Star Game From Georgia in Response to Voting Law

M.L.B. Pulls All-Star Game From Georgia in Response to Voting Law

Sports
Major League Baseball pulled its summer All-Star Game out of suburban Atlanta on Friday, the first major rebuke to the new Republican-backed elections law in Georgia that particularly curtails voting access in the state’s urban areas. The decision by the baseball commissioner, Rob Manfred, came after days of pressure from civil rights groups and the Major League Baseball Players Association. The action is likely to put additional pressure on other leading organizations and corporations to consider pulling business out of Georgia, a move that both Republicans and Democrats in the state oppose despite fiercely disagreeing about the new voting law. Baseball’s decision comes as other states are moving closer to passing new laws that would further restrict voting in their states. In Texas, home...
Broadcasting ‘the Shock, the Horror, the Outrage’ Live, Again and Again

Broadcasting ‘the Shock, the Horror, the Outrage’ Live, Again and Again

Business
Last week, the CNN anchor Brianna Keilar found herself, for the second time in under a week, guiding viewers through the grim ritual of trying, and failing, to make sense of another mass shooting.This time, it was 10 people dead at a grocery store in Boulder, Colo. Only a few days before, she had interviewed a survivor of the rampage at Atlanta-area massage parlors. In 2019, Ms. Keilar reported on the back-to-back shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio. In 2018, she spoke with relatives of students killed in the shooting in Parkland, Fla. Broadcast journalists like Ms. Keilar, 40, have now spent the bulk of their reporting careers chronicling an unending, uniquely American horror show: the random gun massacre. She was CNN’s first journalist to arrive on the Virginia Tech campus in 2...