Friday, January 21News That Matters

Tag: Cooking and Cookbooks

Kamal Mouzawak Is Championing Lebanon’s Culinary Traditions

Travel
As this operation carries on under the leadership of Mr. Mouzawak’s business partner, Christine Codsi, Mr. Mouzawak is building anew in France, with Tawlet Paris, a canteen and grocer which opened this month in the 11th arrondissement.During the restaurant’s opening week, Mr. Mouzawak talked about his journey from one market to many, his feelings about leaving Lebanon — a former French mandate — and how food can unite.The conversation has been edited for length and clarity.What was your goal when you started Souk el Tayeb?I was trying to change the world. I still want to change the world! It’s not that I decided to do it, I just followed a stream. Nothing I’ve done in my life has been with long term planning. During the war, Lebanon was divided into small parts, each unreachable from the o...

11 One-Pot Chicken Dinner Recipes

LifeStyle
For many of us, getting a home-cooked dinner on the table after a long day is a tiny miracle, so choosing a dish that doesn’t require a lot of clean-up is especially important. These 11 one-pot (or -pan) chicken dishes are here to save you from the sink. Full disclosure: Some of these recipes require an additional bowl or two for prep, but the complete meal is finished in a single vessel, so you can serve right from the stove. Since we know many of you will ask, yes, several of the recipes that call for bone-in chicken can be made with boneless chicken thighs or breasts: Just reduce your cook time accordingly.Aaron Hutcherson devised this brilliant recipe for cooking bone-in chicken, broccoli and orzo all at once — a true one-pot wonder. Olive oil and butter provide plenty of richness, whi...
Why the Secret to Easy Homemade Pizza Is French Bread

Why the Secret to Easy Homemade Pizza Is French Bread

LifeStyle
Making pizza at home sounds fun, but homemade pizza dough can be finicky, even if you’ve had a lot of practice. Still, that doesn’t mean delivery is the only way to satisfy a craving.Solution: French bread. Squishy supermarket French bread is a ready-made vehicle for your favorite pizza toppings. Sure, you could just buy a box of Stouffer’s, but with a little planning, homemade French bread pizza makes a great meal after a day’s work.Store-bought French bread can vary pretty widely in size. The measurements offered in these recipes should cover larger 16-ounce loaves, but trust your gut when topping: Smaller loaves may require a thinner layer of sauce or slightly less cheese. Dig out some of the soft interior of the loaf as well. Toss it into a food processor and pulse to make bread crumbs...
Counter the Winter Chill With This Farro and Gruyère Gratin

Counter the Winter Chill With This Farro and Gruyère Gratin

LifeStyle
Quick-cooking farro, with its nutty flavor and plump, chewy texture, is the darling of the grain bowl, the star of countless salads and the foundation of many traditional Italian soups.It’s also pretty wonderful mixed with mushrooms and cheese, and baked into a golden-topped gratin.Other than homey rice bakes, there aren’t a lot of grain gratin recipes, possibly because grains are already filling enough, needing no extra heft from the addition of dairy and eggs.But in the depths of winter, when rib-sticking dishes are at their most appealing, a farro and mushroom gratin can be exactly right. And this one works on its own, served as a meatless main course (maybe rounded out with a crisp green salad), or as a rich side dish alongside chicken or fish.The most efficient way to make this recipe...
11 Macaroni and Cheese Recipes to Curl Up With on the Couch

11 Macaroni and Cheese Recipes to Curl Up With on the Couch

LifeStyle
All macaroni and cheese is good macaroni and cheese, but these recipes from New York Times Cooking are especially fine — and wide-ranging, whether saucy or creamy, tender or crispy, meat-studded or dairy-free. The picks below include some of the greatest interpretations, both classic and clever. Stouffer’s macaroni and cheese is, in Eric Kim’s opinion, the most exemplary version of the dish. After testing a number of techniques and ratios, he finally came up with his nostalgic, creamy, Velveeta-y take.For many Southerners, this recipe from Millie Peartree, adapted by Kiera Wright-Ruiz, is as classic as it gets. The base of milk and eggs lends the pasta an extra-rich, custardy texture, particularly in the molten center (arguably the best part).Recipe: Southern Macaroni and CheeseKnow what y...
When to Skip Browning for Moist Chicken

When to Skip Browning for Moist Chicken

LifeStyle
When you’re thinking about what to make for dinner, the question is often “What do I feel like cooking?” But it can also be “How do I feel like cooking it?”Sometimes, you want to towel-dry, salt-scrub and bronze each piece of chicken, relishing the sizzle, before adding liquid. Other times, you’d rather take it easy, skip the browning altogether and pile everything into a pot, then let it simmer, steaming your face over it as it bubbles.Skipping browning isn’t a shortcut, but is instead another path to delicious results. Think about chicken soup: Because the chicken isn’t browned, it’s spoon-tender with a delicate flavor. The same goes for chicken mafe, chicken tinga, khao man gai and so many other classic dishes. When lean chicken is seared over intense, dry heat, its juices can evaporate...

A Potato Gratin That Innovates on Tradition

LifeStyle
LONDON — The quiet of January offers me a moment to look back at the weeks that came before and make heads or tails of them all. I am particularly interested in traditions: how they almost sneak up on us and surprise us, despite our misguided assumption that we are fully in control. And I can’t think of a better illustration of the fluidity of tradition, its almost arbitrary nature, than our — and that’s a big our, the entirety of humanity, more or less — response to recent times.In many cultures, family traditions have their big moment in late December, when we gather in groups, each with its own customs, to re-establish the circles that define us. But the colossal disruption brought about by a pandemic that’s now nearly two years old has meant that just about everyone has had to adjust t...
Turkey Chili and Biscuits for an Easy Weeknight Dinner

Turkey Chili and Biscuits for an Easy Weeknight Dinner

LifeStyle
Cooking a big pot of beef, beans and spices for hours may be one of the most traditional ways to make chili. But it’s not the only way, and it’s not what I’ve been doing lately as my beef consumption continues to plummet.To my mind, once you have all those beans and onions and chiles and spices simmering away, adding beef to the pot is simply a waste. I eat beef so infrequently that, when I do, I want it to be the star of the plate — a rare steak, a juicy burger, tender morsels of short rib or brisket dripping their heady gravy onto my generously buttered noodles. Or maybe I’ll even go for a pot of beef chili without any beans at all (which, according to multitudes in Texas and beyond, is the only acceptable way to prepare it).Instead, I usually stick to bean chilies that are either vegeta...

The Most-Read Food Stories of 2021

LifeStyle
And so closes the second year of the pandemic, 12 months more of worry, of working from home, of trying to make each meal feel like something new. The articles that readers of the Food section and New York Times Cooking craved this year acknowledged this new reality. Many of our most-read stories offered tips for making weeknight meals faster and more delicious. Some fed readers’ curiosity about a return to dining out, and others delved into disturbing territory: a Southern farmer’s discovery that her ancestors had enslaved people, and revelations about sexual harassment and other abuses at a destination restaurant in Washington State. Here are the articles, in ascending order:In June, the world-renowned restaurant Eleven Madison Park revamped its elaborate tasting menu to be strictly vega...
Crispy Tofu and Vegetables Dinner

Crispy Tofu and Vegetables Dinner

LifeStyle
I used to be convinced that the only way to get truly crisp tofu was to fry it.I’d roasted it and broiled it, but I was never able to achieve those burnished, crisp corners that a pan full of screaming-hot oil reliably delivered.Then I tried a technique from Jenny Rosenstrach’s excellent cookbook, “The Weekday Vegetarians,” and everything changed.The method involved coating tofu cubes with a mix of oil and cornstarch before roasting them at high heat. It was the cornstarch that made the difference. When roasted without it, the tofu turns brown but stays soft. It’s the starch that adds the crunch, without splattering oil all over my stove and floor the way frying would. I was hooked.The beauty of this recipe, other than the crunch, is how adaptable it is. You can spike the cornstarch mix wi...