Friday, October 22News That Matters

Tag: Design

Shopping for Swing-Arm Lamps

LifeStyle
Swing-arm sconces put light exactly where you need it. And they’re especially helpful in spaces where you don’t have wiring for a ceiling fixture or a place for a free-standing lamp.“I do love a swing-arm,” said Heidi Caillier, an interior designer based in Seattle. “They’re really great for directed reading light, and feel more discreet than a decorative lamp that takes up real estate.”Ms. Caillier frequently mounts a pair of small ones on either side of the headboard in a bedroom, or installs a single, large one in living and media rooms.But whatever the space, a big part of the swing-arm lamp’s appeal is its ability to move.“You can tuck it away and then pull it out when you need it,” she said. And if you have children, she added, a swing-arm sconce eliminates “lamps on tables that kids...

Today’s Must-Have Amenity? A Little Green Space.

LifeStyle
RockFarmer Properties put a similar emphasis on weaving landscaping into the heart of its new building, the Rowan, a 46-unit condo at 21-21 31st Street in Astoria, Queens, designed by the architecture firm DXA Studio, with the horticultural designer Patrick Cullina. There, residents returning home will pass through a street-side garden to a green-roofed, glass-walled lobby with a private courtyard garden. About half of the apartments have private outdoor space, and about half of those outdoor spaces are sizable, said John Petras, a founder of RockFarmer Properties — “anywhere from 500 to, in some cases, 1,500 square feet.”When the pandemic stuck soon after sales started last year, the developers worried. “But after about a month, I was just shocked,” Mr. Petras said. “We were selling units...

A Designer Who Finds Beauty in Decay

Technology
ONE OF THE designer Marcin Rusak’s lasting memories from his childhood in Poland was spending time in his family’s greenhouses. His maternal great-grandfather and grandfather were flower growers in Warsaw and, although their business shuttered just before he was born, he often played in those abandoned, overgrown glass structures. “I can still feel the warmth and smell the weeds and bacteria growing there,” he says.It’s fitting, then, that the 34-year-old has built an international following for furnishings and objects that incorporate flowers and plants in unexpected ways. About a decade ago, while in his master’s program at London’s Royal College of Art, he began using discarded blooms from a flower market to create painterly textiles, pressing the petals’ natural pigments onto silk —&nb...
A Day in the Studio With Salehe Bembury

A Day in the Studio With Salehe Bembury

LifeStyle
“Three years ago, that wasn’t happening,” Kevin Trotman, an associate product manager of global collaborations at New Balance, said in an interview. “It just speaks volumes to Salehe and our other partners — people are very excited about it because they trust him. He’s proven himself to the point where it’s like, OK, this is going to be fire, whatever it is.”His first collaboration with New Balance was a bright, burnt orange furry sneaker he called “Peace Be the Journey.” This year’s collaboration was a lime green, cerulean blue and tan leather pair that he named “Water Be the Guide.”And he has another highly anticipated shoe release in December — a collaboration with Crocs. His design is a significant departure for the brand: Lines, not holes, flow in a wavy pattern and wrap around the de...
Bridal Fashion Week: Andrew Kwon Bridal Collection

Bridal Fashion Week: Andrew Kwon Bridal Collection

LifeStyle
The Korean-American designer Andrew Kwon had always envisioned dressing women for the red carpet. The pandemic prompted him to change direction and focus on bridal fashion.“I knew I would do bridal one day,” said Mr. Kwon, 25, who grew up in Colorado Springs and came to New York in 2014. “I also knew I couldn’t sit at home waiting for Covid to go away. Brides were still going to get married. The weddings might be smaller or they would be postponed, but they needed their red carpet moment, which is walking down the aisle.”Mr. Kwon spent months reflecting on life and his career, then he got creative. By December 2020 he had six dresses and two veils. His first bridal collection, Reminiscence, debuted at the Council of Fashion Designers of America’s Runway360, a digital platform for designers...
When Old Spoons Make Really Great Necklaces

When Old Spoons Make Really Great Necklaces

LifeStyle
Fashion Week is back in full force, and there’s a lot to see. Blink (or scroll too fast on Instagram) and you’ll miss the details: tiny bags, tall shoes, feathered hats, leather capes and diamond dog collars. So as part of a new series, Wow Moment, we’ll spotlight things we saw on the runways that delighted or mystified us.PARIS — For environmentally conscious designers, the concept of zero waste is an important one: Let not one scrap of fabric go to the landfill. For Marine Serre, the dynamic young French designer, that rule extends to the cutlery drawer, too.Her new jewelry designs — part of her spring 2022 collection, presented Monday night in a Parisian courtyard — were made of antique silverware acquired at flea markets, Ms. Serre said. A spoon became a bracelet, curving around the wr...
Shopping for Canopy Beds

Shopping for Canopy Beds

LifeStyle
Any bed can provide a place to sleep, but a canopy bed does something more.“You can create a room within a room,” said Sandra Nunnerley, an interior designer in New York. “It’s like a cocoon.”That’s why she installed a custom canopy bed in her New York apartment and frequently specifies them for clients’ homes, as well. “They’re heavenly to sleep under,” she said.There are various ways of getting a canopy effect. One is to buy a bed with a canopy structure; another is to do what Ms. Nunnerley did in her home: Mount a fabric canopy on the ceiling that suspends curtains at the corners of the bed.Either way, a canopy can provide an extra touch of comfort heading into fall.“We’ve done many of them over the years,” Ms. Nunnerley said. “And I’ve never met anybody who doesn’t like to sleep in one...
Want to Increase Your Home’s Value? Start With the Entrance.

Want to Increase Your Home’s Value? Start With the Entrance.

LifeStyle
The entrance to your home is often its public face, communicating your sense of style to the world. It’s also a transition space that can be either inviting or forbidding — a source of pleasure or frustration.“I think of it as an outdoor room, and it’s the first room you come into contact with, which sets the stage for everything you’re going to experience in the house,” said Scott J. Sottile, a partner at Ferguson & Shamamian Architects, a New York-based firm whose latest book, “Collaborations: Architecture, Interiors, Landscapes,” will be published next month.So getting the design right, Mr. Sottile said, is “incredibly important.”The front entrance is also a place where a few inexpensive changes can boost a home’s overall value. “In a very direct way, we think curb appeal increases ...
A New Way to Look at Furniture in Milan

A New Way to Look at Furniture in Milan

LifeStyle
It has been 60 years since Salone del Mobile Milano, the premier annual exhibition of furniture, was founded, and two and a half years since crowds last gathered in Milan’s exhibition halls to admire the relentless creativity of international designers and manufacturers.A spirit of innovation continues to drive the fair, not least in the way its organizers have responded to the pandemic. Sunday marked the opening of a special edition called Supersalone.With 423 exhibitors, about a quarter of the usual number, Supersalone is a scaled-down affair, “but in a certain way it is bigger in terms of our capacity to experiment with the format,” said Stefano Boeri, a Milanese architect and the event’s curator. Exhibitor booths have been replaced with display walls that are hung with products and all...
Shopping for Room Dividers

Shopping for Room Dividers

LifeStyle
A folding screen is useful for dividing space, but it can do so much more.“It really is a great way to bring in scale, texture, artistry or a decorative moment,” said Thom Filicia, the New York-based interior designer.Screens, he noted, are essentially pop-up architecture.Mr. Filicia uses them to separate various seating areas in one big space, or to soften the corners of a room. He uses them to hide ugly heating and air-conditioning equipment, and to frame or emphasize furniture, mirrors and art. And he has used them to create privacy in glass-walled apartments.While room dividers were once de rigueur in professionally designed interiors, they are a little less common today. But Mr. Filicia thinks they’re due for a pandemic-driven comeback.“Now that everyone’s doing home offices, I think ...