Friday, October 22News That Matters

Tag: Floyd, George (d 2020)

It’s My Job to Watch. With George Floyd’s Death, I Had to Look Away.

It’s My Job to Watch. With George Floyd’s Death, I Had to Look Away.

LifeStyle
I’ve never watched the video of George Floyd’s murder. My decision wasn’t premeditated or preordained, but rather an improvised refusal. I did not want to be another spectator of that oldest of American rituals: the killing of a Black person in public.My resistance was not heroic; I’ve just learned not to trust what I see. My doubt started 30 years ago when I, like much of the country, saw another recording, this time a videotape in which four white officers of the Los Angeles Police Department mercilessly beat Rodney King on the side of a San Fernando Valley street. During my senior year of high school, my mainly white classmates and I argued about the case. I believed the grainy black and white footage, shot on a home video camera by George Holliday, a 31-year-old white plumber, to be in...
As the Chauvin Trial Closes, Will Seeing Be Believing?

As the Chauvin Trial Closes, Will Seeing Be Believing?

LifeStyle
After weeks of testimony and months of anguish, the arguments in the trial of Derek Chauvin came down to: Should you believe your eyes?In a closing argument aired and streamed nationwide, the prosecutor Steve Schleicher hit many of the points you would expect in arguing to convict the police officer in the killing of George Floyd: the timeline, the expert testimony, the elements of the charges. But ultimately the part of star witness was played by the bystander video that detailed Mr. Floyd’s final minutes.In a way, the trial began as soon as the video emerged after Mr. Floyd’s death last May, beginning a summer of protest and leading to a national reckoning. If you haven’t seen it at this point, it has probably taken a concerted effort.The Chauvin trial was not like many high-profile case...
Facebook, Preparing for Chauvin Verdict, Will Limit Posts That Might Incite Violence

Facebook, Preparing for Chauvin Verdict, Will Limit Posts That Might Incite Violence

Technology
Facebook on Monday said it planned to limit posts that contain misinformation and hate speech related to the trial of Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer charged with the murder of George Floyd, to keep them from spilling over into real-world harm.As closing arguments began in the trial and Minneapolis braced for a verdict, Facebook said it would identify and remove posts on the social network that urged people to bring arms to the city. It also said it would protect members of Mr. Floyd’s family from harassment and take down content that praised, celebrated or mocked his death.“We know this trial has been painful for many people,” Monika Bickert, Facebook’s vice president of content policy, wrote in a blog post. “We want to strike the right balance between allowing people...
Would You Jump In to Stop an Assault?

Would You Jump In to Stop an Assault?

Technology
Fear is not the only factor that determines whether bystanders act in such moments. Bibb Latané, a social psychologist who helped pioneer the field of bystander intervention in the years following the Kitty Genovese murder, described another dynamic at play: the diffusion of responsibility that can lead to inaction among strangers who witness a crime.A Rise in Anti-Asian AttacksA torrent of hate and violence against people of Asian descent around the U.S. began last spring, in the early days of the coronavirus pandemic. Community leaders say the bigotry was spurred by the rhetoric of former President Trump, who referred to the coronavirus as the “China virus.”In New York, a wave of xenophobia and violence has been compounded by the economic fallout of the pandemic, which has deal...