Friday, October 22News That Matters

Tag: Furniture

The Austin Bungalow Had Charm. But It ‘Needed Everything.’

The Austin Bungalow Had Charm. But It ‘Needed Everything.’

LifeStyle
Ricardo and Daphny Ainslie happened upon the house that would become their home while strolling the North University neighborhood of Austin, Texas, in 2009 and noticing a dejected-looking man outside a compact 1920s bungalow.“There was a realtor sitting, literally with head in hand, on the front steps,” said Mr. Ainslie, 72, a psychology professor at University of Texas at Austin who is also a writer, filmmaker and musician.After striking up a conversation, the agent told them that a prospective buyer had just canceled a contract to buy the house. “The reason ended up being that they found so many problems,” Mr. Ainslie said, including issues with the foundation, plumbing and wiring.“It needed everything,” said Ms. Ainslie, 42, a forensic psychologist.Nevertheless, the couple was looking f...

Shopping for Swing-Arm Lamps

LifeStyle
Swing-arm sconces put light exactly where you need it. And they’re especially helpful in spaces where you don’t have wiring for a ceiling fixture or a place for a free-standing lamp.“I do love a swing-arm,” said Heidi Caillier, an interior designer based in Seattle. “They’re really great for directed reading light, and feel more discreet than a decorative lamp that takes up real estate.”Ms. Caillier frequently mounts a pair of small ones on either side of the headboard in a bedroom, or installs a single, large one in living and media rooms.But whatever the space, a big part of the swing-arm lamp’s appeal is its ability to move.“You can tuck it away and then pull it out when you need it,” she said. And if you have children, she added, a swing-arm sconce eliminates “lamps on tables that kids...
Can You Renovate a Rental Apartment? Sure, if You’re Careful.

Can You Renovate a Rental Apartment? Sure, if You’re Careful.

LifeStyle
“They weren’t thrilled about it at first,” she said, adding that she was going for a minimalist, Donald Judd-inspired look. “I actually had to sell it to them, as if I was pitching a potential new client. I was like, ‘I’m an interior designer and here’s my vision.’ And I had to share a mood board.”The landlords agreed, and Ms. Piscione hired a millworker to do the job, which included building an additional bank of open plywood shelves for another wall of the kitchen.She repainted most of the interior walls, including feature walls in the living room and bedroom that got a faux-concrete finish. “I wanted that somewhat-rustic-cabin, somewhat-Japanese vibe,” she said, which turned out to be an ideal background for Zoom calls.Beyond those changes, the house is a study in how much an interior c...
Shopping for Canopy Beds

Shopping for Canopy Beds

LifeStyle
Any bed can provide a place to sleep, but a canopy bed does something more.“You can create a room within a room,” said Sandra Nunnerley, an interior designer in New York. “It’s like a cocoon.”That’s why she installed a custom canopy bed in her New York apartment and frequently specifies them for clients’ homes, as well. “They’re heavenly to sleep under,” she said.There are various ways of getting a canopy effect. One is to buy a bed with a canopy structure; another is to do what Ms. Nunnerley did in her home: Mount a fabric canopy on the ceiling that suspends curtains at the corners of the bed.Either way, a canopy can provide an extra touch of comfort heading into fall.“We’ve done many of them over the years,” Ms. Nunnerley said. “And I’ve never met anybody who doesn’t like to sleep in one...
Before Renovating, They Had to Get Rid of the Current Occupants: Mice

Before Renovating, They Had to Get Rid of the Current Occupants: Mice

LifeStyle
Drew and Jeanne Barber thought they had found a heavenly place to raise their two young children when they toured a four-bedroom, 4,900-square-foot house on 11 acres in Farmington, Conn., in 2018.A 1975 house with a gambrel roof that had been expanded with multiple additions, it offered plenty of space to spread out, manicured gardens, a cute stone pool house for the summer and — most important for Mr. Barber, an avid hockey fan — a big yard capable of accommodating an ice rink in the winter.But it also had something less desirable that the couple didn’t discover until it was too late: a thriving colony of mice.After closing that August for $900,000, they moved in with their children, Camden and Colette, now 8 and 6, and were happy enough for the first couple of months. The interior of the...
A New Way to Look at Furniture in Milan

A New Way to Look at Furniture in Milan

LifeStyle
It has been 60 years since Salone del Mobile Milano, the premier annual exhibition of furniture, was founded, and two and a half years since crowds last gathered in Milan’s exhibition halls to admire the relentless creativity of international designers and manufacturers.A spirit of innovation continues to drive the fair, not least in the way its organizers have responded to the pandemic. Sunday marked the opening of a special edition called Supersalone.With 423 exhibitors, about a quarter of the usual number, Supersalone is a scaled-down affair, “but in a certain way it is bigger in terms of our capacity to experiment with the format,” said Stefano Boeri, a Milanese architect and the event’s curator. Exhibitor booths have been replaced with display walls that are hung with products and all...
Shopping for Room Dividers

Shopping for Room Dividers

LifeStyle
A folding screen is useful for dividing space, but it can do so much more.“It really is a great way to bring in scale, texture, artistry or a decorative moment,” said Thom Filicia, the New York-based interior designer.Screens, he noted, are essentially pop-up architecture.Mr. Filicia uses them to separate various seating areas in one big space, or to soften the corners of a room. He uses them to hide ugly heating and air-conditioning equipment, and to frame or emphasize furniture, mirrors and art. And he has used them to create privacy in glass-walled apartments.While room dividers were once de rigueur in professionally designed interiors, they are a little less common today. But Mr. Filicia thinks they’re due for a pandemic-driven comeback.“Now that everyone’s doing home offices, I think ...
The T List: Six Things We Recommend This Week

The T List: Six Things We Recommend This Week

Travel
Welcome to the T List, a newsletter from the editors of T Magazine. Each week, we share things we’re eating, wearing, listening to or coveting now. Sign up here to find us in your inbox every Wednesday. And you can always reach us at tlist@nytimes.com.visit ThisArt Deco Splendor in the City of LightBy Noor BraraLocated in the heart of the city, the new Cheval Blanc Paris has 72 rooms, with balconies or winter gardens looking out either on the Pont Neuf or the picturesque rooftops of the 1st Arrondissement and beyond. The hotel, set in a 1928 Art Deco building designed by Henri Sauvage and reimagined by the architect and designer Peter Marino, feels like a grand but familiar home, with sculptural chandeliers by Philippe Anthonioz, engraved metallic tables by André Dubreuil and wood sideboar...
A Derelict Warehouse as a Second Home?

A Derelict Warehouse as a Second Home?

LifeStyle
When Michael Northrup began fantasizing about buying a derelict fruit-processing and storage facility in Tieton, Wash., as his second home, even his design-savvy friends weren’t sure what to think.On his first visit in 2015, he said, “I took a developer friend, an architect friend and my best friend.” They all thought he was out of his mind.The roughly 10,000-square-foot building was uninhabitable and had been ransacked and stripped of much of its electrical wiring. But after months of house hunting in the area, which Mr. Northrup loved for its burgeoning creative scene about 150 miles southeast of his primary home in Seattle, he was ready to make a move.It was an unconventional idea, but Mr. Northrup, 52, an amateur artist who works in cloud computing at Accenture, was struck by the beaut...
‘The Opposite of Airlines’: When Larger Audiences Require Fewer Seats

‘The Opposite of Airlines’: When Larger Audiences Require Fewer Seats

LifeStyle
SAN FRANCISCO — Wagner was the worst. Five hours — sometimes more — of squirming in 1932-era seats at the War Memorial Opera House here, sinking into lumpy, dusty cushions, suffering the bulge of the springs and the pinch of the wide armrests, craning for a glimpse of the stage around the head of the tall person one row ahead.“Particularly on a long opera — oh my God,” said Tapan Bhat, a tech executive and a season-ticket holder at the San Francisco Opera since 1996.When the San Francisco Opera opens Saturday, starting its scaled-back 99th season with Puccini’s “Tosca” after a shutdown of more than a year, those punishing seats will be gone. The opera has used its forced sabbatical to complete a long-planned $3.53 million project to replace all 3,128 seats with more comfortable, roomier on...