Friday, October 22News That Matters

Tag: Millennial Generation

Group Tour Companies Seeing Increase in Solo Travelers

Travel
After Sheila Katz’s husband died of a degenerative nervous system disorder in April, she knew she had to get away. But her husband had been her travel partner, and without him, she was hesitant to travel alone. The pandemic’s ever-shifting travel regulations were intimidating as well. So Ms. Katz, 45, did something she’d never done before: She joined a group tour.“I wanted to not be totally alone, but also to be able to do my own thing when I wanted,” she said. So in July, she joined a group of 17 fully vaccinated travelers heading to Belize with EF Go Ahead Tours, making friends as she snorkeled, visited Mayan ruins and took chocolate- and tortilla-making classes.Solo travelers like Ms. Katz are joining guided tours at unprecedented rates, say tour organizers, with some companies reportin...
Now Going Viral: Meeting Online Friends in Real Life

Now Going Viral: Meeting Online Friends in Real Life

Technology
Marissa Meizz, 23, was out to dinner with a friend in the East Village in mid-May when her phone started buzzing. She tried to silence it, but the texts kept coming. They all wanted to know: Had she seen the TikTok video?She clicked the link and a young man appeared onscreen. “If your name’s Marissa,” he said, “please listen up.” He said he had just overheard some of her friends say they were deliberately choosing to hold a birthday party when she was out of town that weekend. “You need to know,” he said. “TikTok, help me find Marissa.”Ms. Meizz’s heart sank. After getting in touch with the man who posted the video, which amassed more than 14 million views, she confirmed that she was the Marissa in question and that it was her friends who had conspired to exclude her from their party.Her f...
Return to Office Hits a Snag: Young Resisters

Return to Office Hits a Snag: Young Resisters

Business
David Gross, an executive at a New York-based advertising agency, convened the troops over Zoom this month to deliver a message he and his fellow partners were eager to share: It was time to think about coming back to the office.Mr. Gross, 40, wasn’t sure how employees, many in their 20s and early 30s, would take it. The initial response — dead silence — wasn’t encouraging. Then one young man signaled he had a question. “Is the policy mandatory?” he wanted to know.Yes, it is mandatory, for three days a week, he was told.Thus began a tricky conversation at Anchor Worldwide, Mr. Gross’s firm, that is being replicated this summer at businesses big and small across the country. While workers of all ages have become accustomed to dialing in and skipping the wearying commute, younger ones have g...
Congratulations! It’s a Start-Up.

Congratulations! It’s a Start-Up.

Business
Sid Singh, 36, was joking recently with a friend that everyone he knew seemed to be having their third baby while he was bringing something entirely different into the world. He had just quit his consulting job to build a financial coaching company. It dawned on him that he could have a baby shower for his new endeavor.“It’s a big shift for someone in their 30s to quit their job and restart their life,” said Mr. Singh, who lives in Brooklyn. “It’s probably one of the most momentous things you can do.”In November, long before he had investors, a public relations budget or a stream of clients for the company he called Ready.Steady.Money, Mr. Singh gathered about 30 friends at an outdoor Italian restaurant in the Williamsburg area of Brooklyn. Over pizza and beer, he explained his vision and ...
Retirement: ‘A Struggle for the Millennials’

Retirement: ‘A Struggle for the Millennials’

Business
According to a survey released in December by the TransAmerica Center for Retirement Studies, 15 percent of millennials said they had taken an early withdrawal from a 401(k) or similar plan, compared with 10 percent of Generation X and 4 percent of baby boomers.“It hit me hard. Real hard. I had to dip into savings. I had to dip into my 401(k),” said Matt Burns, an Austin, Texas, resident who was furloughed from his job at a company that produces corporate events.“Those bills, they come like clockwork,” Mr. Burns, 41, said. “I pay $600 a month in child support, and I’m still paying rent and utilities and all.” He estimated that he had drawn down roughly $10,000, first depleting the few thousand dollars he had in savings before using the CARES Act provision to withdraw from his 401(k).Now, h...
Millennial Car Buyers Storm the Market, Happy to Shun Showrooms

Millennial Car Buyers Storm the Market, Happy to Shun Showrooms

Business
Contrary to popular belief, millennials don’t hate cars. They hate car dealerships.But the pandemic has pushed car dealers to step up online sales, eliminating what millennials (and others) dreaded: showroom visits that averaged five hours, haggling, paperwork, and high-pressure pitches for add-on products like wheel and tire insurance.“I dislike the car dealer rigmarole of ‘Let me go talk to my manager’ and ‘Let’s go over to the finance department,’” said Will Clark, 38, a recent car shopper who lives in a suburb of Portland, Ore. “I don’t get the whole ‘You’ve got to take it for a spin, kick the tires!’ That was a model when cars weren’t the same quality they are today across the board.”Millennials were presumed to dislike cars because — thanks to alternatives like Uber, Lyft and helicop...
House Hunters Are Leaving the City, and Builders Can’t Keep Up

House Hunters Are Leaving the City, and Builders Can’t Keep Up

Business
River Islands, the development where the Namayans hoped to live, is in Lathrop, Calif., which has a population of 25,000. It sits about a half-hour beyond Altamont Pass, whose rolling hills and windmills mark the border between Alameda and San Joaquin Counties. Though technically outside the Bay Area region, Lathrop’s farms and open fields have been steadily supplanted by warehouses and subdivisions as it and nearby cities have become bedroom communities for priced-out workers who commute to the Silicon Valley and San Francisco.Today in BusinessUpdated May 28, 2021, 12:54 p.m. ETIn Livermore, on the eastern side of Alameda County, the typical home value is nearing $1 million, according to Zillow. That falls to $500,000 to $600,000 over the hill in places like Tracy, Manteca and Lathro...
Should We Really Embrace ’90s Fashion?

Should We Really Embrace ’90s Fashion?

LifeStyle
I wonder what you think about all the 1990s trends coming back? I see those trends everywhere. (It brings me back to Contempo Casuals and Wet Seal times.) And as a member of Gen X, I have feelings of jealousy, like: “I lived through it first.” But do you belong to the “if you wore it once, you can’t wear it again” team, which says that only the young can do nostalgia dressing, or to the “once again, for old time’s sake” team? — Leonor, MadridAs far as I am concerned, when Harry Styles wore a yellow plaid Gucci blazer and lavender feather boa to perform at the Grammys in apparent homage to Alicia Silverstone’s character in “Clueless,” it was final proof (if any were needed) that the ’90s, that decade of grunge, slip dresses, knee socks, chokers, tracksuits and oversize blazers (well, hello,...
What Is ‘Cheugy’? You Know It When You See It.

What Is ‘Cheugy’? You Know It When You See It.

LifeStyle
“OK TikTok, I have a new word for you that my friends and I use that you clearly are all in need of,” Hallie Cain, 24, a copywriter in Los Angeles says in a TikTok posted on March 30.In the video, she gestures to another video of a girl who is describing “the type of people who get married at 20 years old” or have millennial “girlboss energy” and who wonders: What do we call this kind of person?“I keep seeing videos like this,” Ms. Cain says in her TikTok. “The word, my friend, is ‘cheugy.’”It’s not quite “basic,” which can describe someone who is a conformist or perhaps generic in their tastes, and it’s not quite “uncool.” It’s not embarrassing or even always negative. Cheugy (pronounced chew-gee) can be used, broadly, to describe someone who is out of date or trying too hard. And while a...
Welcome to the YOLO Economy

Welcome to the YOLO Economy

Technology
In addition to the job-hopping you’d expect during boom times, the pandemic has created many more remote jobs, and expanded the number of companies willing to hire outside of big, coastal cities. That has given workers in remote-friendly industries, such as tech and finance, more leverage to ask for what they want.“Employees have a totally unprecedented ability to negotiate in the next 18 to 48 months,” said Johnathan Nightingale, an author and a co-founder of Raw Signal Group, a management training firm. “If I, as an individual, am dissatisfied with the current state of my employment, I have so many more options than I used to have.”Individual YOLO decisions can be chalked up to many factors: cabin fever, low interest rates, the emergence of new get-rich-quick schemes like NFTs and meme s...