Tuesday, November 30News That Matters

Tag: Noodles

Restaurant Review: Cha Kee in Manhattan’s Chinatown

LifeStyle
All good New Yorkers know that Lower Manhattan would lose a piece of its identity if Chinese businesses disappeared from Chinatown. In Little Italy, when the Italian Americans moved away, real estate brokers scrubbed one part of the area of its ethnic identity by renaming it NoLIta. If this tactic is successful a few blocks south, we could see apartment listings on Doyers and Pell Streets advertising their prime location in the heart of SoChiTo.Walk around the neighborhood on any given day, and this scenario won’t seem as far-fetched as it should be. Chinatown started to empty out almost two years ago, when Covid-19 was still a rumor in New York City but a poisonous anti-Asian mood was rising, and it is still not packed the way it used to be. The tourists the area depends on still haven’t ...
This Vegan Ramen Maximizes Flavor and Time

This Vegan Ramen Maximizes Flavor and Time

LifeStyle
With most ramen, the work that’s put into the broth is what makes all the difference, providing the foundation for the entire dish. A broth made with pork, chicken or seafood can be cooked for up to three days, resulting in an intense, velvety soup that sings with complex, multilayered flavors.So it may feel unfair to stack a quick-cooked vegan broth up against a meaty one that has been toiled over for dozens of hours. But the creamy, meatless broth behind tantanmen stands up formidably to the challenge, coming together in little time without sacrificing flavor or body.Tantanmen, which finds its origins in the Sichuan dish dan dan noodles, derives its power not from a labored broth, but from a mildly sweet soy milk base combined with flavorful seasonings, which the Japanese call tare.Here,...
From China’s Far North, a Paradoxical Noodle Lands in Queens

From China’s Far North, a Paradoxical Noodle Lands in Queens

LifeStyle
The first thing you notice about roasted cold noodles, a favorite street food in the far northeastern Chinese province of Heilongjiang, is that they are not cold.We are not dealing here with a dish that will give you relief from swampy August days, like cold sesame noodles; or like Korean mul naengmyeon, a bowl of beef broth in which spaghetti-like strands of vegetable starch lie below shards of floating ice; or like buckwheat soba coiled on a bamboo mat beside their chilled dipping sauce, tsuketsuyu. Roasted cold noodles are meant to be eaten hot, right off the griddle.They don’t much resemble noodles, either. In form, they are more akin to a rolled, filled omelet, as you will see if you watch them being made through the front window of Followsoshi, a stall inside a Chinese micromall in d...