Tuesday, October 26News That Matters

Tag: Oracle Corporation

Tech Workers Swore Off the Bay Area. Now They’re Coming Back.

Tech Workers Swore Off the Bay Area. Now They’re Coming Back.

Technology
Rizal Wong, a junior associate at the tech and business communications firm Sard Verbinnen and Company, left the Bay Area in December, trading a studio apartment in Oakland for a cheaper one-bedroom in his hometown, Sacramento, close to his family. But after getting vaccinated, he moved to San Francisco in April.“I felt like I was getting back to my life,” said Mr. Wong, 22. “Meeting up with co-workers who were also vaccinated and getting drinks after work, it definitely makes it feel more normal.”Mr. Wong, like many who left the Bay Area, didn’t go very far. Of the more than 170,000 people who moved from the vicinity of San Francisco, Berkeley and Oakland in 2020, the vast majority relocated elsewhere in California, according to United States Postal Service change-of-address data analyzed...
G.O.P. Lawmakers Question Amazon’s Connections on Pentagon Contract

G.O.P. Lawmakers Question Amazon’s Connections on Pentagon Contract

Technology
WASHINGTON — As the Defense Department prepares to solicit bids for cloud-computing work that could yield billions of dollars for Amazon, members of Congress are raising new questions about the company’s efforts to win a $10 billion contract during the Trump administration.Previously unreleased emails show that Pentagon officials in 2017 and 2018 lavished praise on several of the tech executives whose companies expressed interest in the original contract, especially Amazon, while concerns about the company’s access appear to have been glossed over, according to the emails, other documents and interviews.Two Republican lawmakers who have pushed to rein in the dominance of Amazon and other tech companies in consumer markets are seizing on the emails as evidence that Amazon unfairly used its ...
Are Tech’s Wealthiest Men Worth Their Pay?

Are Tech’s Wealthiest Men Worth Their Pay?

Technology
This article is part of the On Tech newsletter. You can sign up here to receive it weekdays.Apple paid its chief executive, Tim Cook, $1.4 billion in total since 2007. Oracle’s chairman, Larry Ellison, racked up stock and cash valued at nearly $1.9 billion over the same period. And Mark Zuckerberg has pulled in $5.7 billion from Facebook since the company went public in 2012.These are among the billion-dollar men of the technology industry. The cumulative paychecks of a half dozen executives topped $13.2 billion, according to a new analysis of the past 15 years. Those are years in which tech companies become powerful forces in the economy, our lives and world affairs. The mood about technology has soured more recently, but the tech bosses’ paychecks mostly remained unscathed.The New York T...
Google Won. So Did Tech.

Google Won. So Did Tech.

Technology
This article is part of the On Tech newsletter. You can sign up here to receive it weekdays.On Monday, the Supreme Court said it was kosher to copy someone else’s computer code in some cases. That handed Google a win in a decade-long court battle with Oracle over the guts of the Android smartphone system.I’ll explain why the technology industry was relieved by the decision, and the ways it might be relevant for artists, writers and archivists. I also want us to ponder this: Why are thorny legal questions seemingly inescapable in technology right now?What was the legal case?Oracle controls software programming technologies called Java that are a building block for many apps and digital services. Google used a relatively small chunk of Java computer code in its Android operating system, and ...
Supreme Court Backs Google in Copyright Fight With Oracle

Supreme Court Backs Google in Copyright Fight With Oracle

Technology
Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justices Sonia Sotomayor, Elena Kagan, Neil M. Gorsuch and Brett M. Kavanaugh joined the majority opinion. Justice Amy Coney Barrett did not participate in the case, which was argued before she joined the court.In dissent, Justice Clarence Thomas, joined by Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr., said leapfrogging the first question was a grave analytical misstep. “The court wrongly sidesteps the principal question that we were asked to answer,” he wrote, adding that he would have ruled that the code was protected by copyright laws.The majority’s approach was inexplicable, Justice Thomas wrote, and its rationale — that technology is rapidly changing — was odd, as change “has been a constant where computers are concerned.”Justice Breyer used what he called a “far-...