Friday, January 21News That Matters

Tag: Photography

A Trove of Old Photos Could Reveal the Future of These Arctic Glaciers

A Trove of Old Photos Could Reveal the Future of These Arctic Glaciers

Technology, World
The mammoth, ethereally beautiful glaciers of the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard, near the North Pole, bear the scars of climate change more than almost anywhere else on the planet.Over the past three decades, Svalbard has warmed twice as quickly as the rest of the Arctic region and seven times the global average. That is causing the islands’ glaciers to melt at an alarming rate, threatening polar bears and other wildlife, and adding to rising sea levels around the globe.For a long time, though, predicting how quickly future warming might cause the ice to retreat took guesswork. In Svalbard and other places, most field measurements started only in the mid-20th century, and satellite observations even later.Now, advances in computing are helping scientists bring old ice back to life in a...
Why a Stranded Barge Has Become a Popular Vancouver Photo Spot

Why a Stranded Barge Has Become a Popular Vancouver Photo Spot

Travel
Every local media outlet has latched onto the barge story line. In December, requests on social media were made to decorate the barge with Christmas lights (it didn’t happen). Memes, like the barge photoshopped as Vancouver’s next luxury condo building — a dig at the city’s notoriously unaffordable housing market, are mass circulated on social media. There is even a popular barge parody Twitter account.“In Vancouver, we have a unique sense of humor, a unique sense of levity, if you will,” said Donnie Rosa, the general manager of the Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation.In fact, the Park Board, which, in 2014, famously approved the renaming of “Guelph Park” in the trendy Mount Pleasant neighborhood just south of downtown to “Dude Chilling Park,” in honor of an art sculpture that looked l...

Celebrating the ‘Great Night of Shiva’ in Kathmandu

Travel
It was the night before a new moon, and a rotating palette of color, reflecting off the buildings, floated like a halo in the mist. Silhouettes of cows dotted my periphery, accompanied by the gentle rustle of their grazing on the riverbank.As I approached the center of the complex, the crowds pressed closer together, filling every inch of the paths and ghats, a term for stairways in the Indian subcontinent, lining the sacred Bagmati River. Those who weren’t huddled under umbrellas or shielded by plastic bags seemed content enough to stick it out in the rain.I had visited this Hindu temple before — Pashupatinath, on the outskirts of Kathmandu, the capital of Nepal — but only in the broad daylight, and never among so many people.The scents of burning wood, marijuana and incense filled the ai...

Our Favorite Arts Photos of 2021

LifeStyle
These are the pictures that defined an unpredictable year across the worlds of art, music, dance and performance.A crush of vaccinated fans pumping their wristbanded hands in the air as rock music returned to Madison Square Garden after 460 days. A masked standing ovation as “Hadestown” became one of the first musicals back on Broadway. A sweaty, pulsing Brooklyn party — social, not distanced.It was a year of reopenings, with an almost palpable darkness-to-light feeling in its giddier moments, many of which were captured by photographers for The New York Times.There were revelatory portraits: a regal André De Shields taking a break from “King Lear”; the pioneering conceptual artist Lorraine O’Grady getting her first retrospective at age 86; the provocative artist and performer Martine Guti...

Helping to Reveal a Still-Shuttered World

Technology, World
In March 2020, as lockdowns fell into place worldwide, The Times’s Travel desk launched a new visual series to help readers cope with their confinement. We called it The World Through a Lens — and, frankly, we didn’t expect it to last this long.But as the weeks turned into months, and the months into years, we’ve continued publishing photo essays each Monday morning, carrying you — virtually — from the islands of Maine to the synagogues of Myanmar, and nearly 100 other places in between.We hope the series has offered you a little solace and a little distraction throughout the pandemic — and perhaps a chance to immerse yourself, if momentarily, in a distant place or culture that may have otherwise gone unnoticed.Below are some of our favorite World Through a Lens essays from the past year.F...
Our Favorite Sports Photos of 2021

Our Favorite Sports Photos of 2021

Sports
We asked some of our photographers to choose their favorite sports images that they made this year and tell us why they liked them. Take a look.I got an email from an editor at The New York Times about a skateboarding project and immediately thought of Naiomi Glasses, whose skateboarding videos on TikTok have gone viral. Glasses, 24, wears her traditional Navajo skirt, turquoise jewelry and hair bun as she sails across the sandstone on a board and four wheels.I met her at a gas station in Rock Point, Ariz., and we went up a mountain. I found a spot and followed her with my camera as she skateboarded effortlessly until the sun went down. This is one of my favorite photographs because it shows the beauty of skateboarding and the Navajo Nation.Photographing HomeKu Stevens ran to honor his anc...
How to Catch a Polar Bear

How to Catch a Polar Bear

Technology
From a helicopter, it can be hard to spot a polar bear against the frozen tundra. So when the polar bear biologist Jon Aars heads out for his annual research trips, he scans the landscape for flashes of movement or subtle variations in color — the slightly yellowish hue of the bears’ fur set off against the white snow.“Also, very often, you see the footprints before you see the bear,” Dr. Aars said. “And the bear is usually where the footprints stop.”Dr. Aars is one in a long line of polar bear researchers at the Norwegian Polar Institute, which has an outpost on Svalbard, an Arctic archipelago. Since 1987, the institute’s scientists have staged annual field trips into the icy wilderness to find and study Svalbard’s polar bears.Over the decades, these research trips have shed light on the ...
Geminid Meteor Shower: How to Watch Its Peak in Night Skies

Geminid Meteor Shower: How to Watch Its Peak in Night Skies

Technology
Night sky enthusiasts are gearing up to enjoy one of the best meteor showers of 2021, the Geminids, which peak on Monday night into Tuesday morning.Along with the Perseids in the summer, the winter Geminids are one of the most anticipated meteor showers of the year, producing potentially a hundred or more spectacular streaks per hour that shoot across the heavens.The Geminids originate from an asteroid called 3200 Phaethon that orbits the sun every 1.4 years, scattering pieces of itself as it travels. Those tiny rocks slam into our atmosphere, creating trails of dazzling light as they burn up. As Earth plows into Phaethon’s debris field, the resulting meteors all appear to streak from a spot in the sky, called a radiant, where the constellation Gemini sits, hence the meteor shower’s name. ...
Cultivating Olives on the Slopes of Mount Etna

Cultivating Olives on the Slopes of Mount Etna

Travel
In the summer of 2020, out of the blue, my father told me of a friend of his who, after decades spent working in Milan as a photojournalist, decided to return to his roots and begin producing extra virgin olive oil at a family farm on the slopes of Mount Etna, an active volcano — Europe’s largest — on the eastern side of Sicily.I flew to meet the man, Enzo Signorelli, at the start of the olive picking season, in late October of the same year. It was very wet the first few days, so the harvest was postponed, and there was no certainty that I’d get to photograph it. Luckily, toward the end of my stay, the sky opened up and gave us two warm and bright days.Because of its height, Mount Etna is visible from virtually everywhere in northeastern Sicily. (In August its summit was 11,014 feet tall,...

Twitter Will Take Down Pictures of People Posted Without Their Permission

Technology
A sweeping expansion of Twitter’s policy against posting private information was met with backlash shortly after the company announced it on Tuesday, as Twitter users questioned whether the policy would be practical to enforce.Twitter’s new policy states that photos or videos of private individuals that are posted without their permission will be taken down at their request. Twitter’s rules already prohibit the posting of private information like addresses, phone numbers and medical records.“When we are notified by individuals depicted, or by an authorized representative, that they did not consent to having their private image or video shared, we will remove it,” Twitter’s new policy states. “This policy is not applicable to media featuring public figures or individuals when media and acco...