Sunday, November 28News That Matters

Tag: Podcasts

Covid-19 Misinformation Goes Unchecked on Radio and Podcasts

Technology
“People develop really close relationships with podcasts,” said Evelyn Douek, a senior research fellow at Columbia University’s Knight First Amendment Institute. “It’s a parasocial medium. There’s something about voice that humans really relate to.”Marc Bernier, a talk radio host in Daytona Beach, Fla., whose show is available for download or streaming on iHeart’s and Apple’s digital platforms, was among the talk radio hosts who died of Covid-19 complications after expressing anti-vaccination views on their programs. The deaths made national news and set off a cascade of commentary on social media. What drew less attention was the industry that helped give them an audience.On a June episode, Mr. Bernier said, after referring to unvaccinated people: “I’m one of them. Judge me if you want.” ...
‘How Long Gone’ Is in It for the Long Haul

‘How Long Gone’ Is in It for the Long Haul

LifeStyle
Mr. Black added: “Just in a lighthearted, fun way. I like punching up.”They are, of course, far from the first pair of friends to turn genuine rapport into digestible content. Last November, Vogue cited “How Long Gone” as proof of the rise of the “bro-cast,” but noted that the format had been popularized quite successfully by women-led shows like “Call Your Girlfriend,” hosted by two “long-distance besties,” long before the quarantine era.Another podcast built around a close personal rapport is “Red Scare,” hosted by Anna Khachiyan and Dasha Nekrasova. The podcast’s focus is political and generally takes up a trolling critique of liberal feminism in all its forms, but Ms. Nekrasova attributes a large degree of the show’s success to the friendship that is centered in each episode. She came ...
The River Cafe in London Gets Into the Podcast Business

The River Cafe in London Gets Into the Podcast Business

LifeStyle
LONDON — Michael Caine has been a regular at the River Cafe for decades, dining with his family, usually on a Wednesday or Thursday, and always at Table 4, the most coveted seat in this celebrated Italian restaurant in Hammersmith.So, when Ruth Rogers, the River Cafe’s American-born proprietor, set about creating a new podcast in which she interviews famous guests about what food means to them, she naturally turned early on to Mr. Caine. For Ms. Rogers, who is known to all as Ruthie, he was comfort food for a first-time podcaster.Mr. Caine spoke vividly about the memorable meals he’d had, his other favorite restaurants — Chasen’s in West Hollywood; Elaine’s in New York — and above all, about his childhood in Cockney London, where fish was always on the menu because his father, a porter in ...
Breaking Down the ‘Wellness-Industrial Complex,’ an Episode at a Time

Breaking Down the ‘Wellness-Industrial Complex,’ an Episode at a Time

LifeStyle
Aubrey Gordon collects vintage diet books. She has amassed almost 100 titles, including the 1973 volume “Slimming Down,” written by Johnny Carson’s sidekick, Ed McMahon. “Slimming Down” — which featured chapter titles like “The Breadstick Conspiracy” and “Two Martinis Into Connecticut” — is the book that began Ms. Gordon’s collection.And while the idea of mixology as nutritional strategy might seem absurd to a reader today, Ms. Gordon said that so much of the current thinking about what is now known as wellness is just as “hilarious and wacky.”On the podcast “Maintenance Phase,” named after the concept of sustaining post-diet weight loss, Ms. Gordon and the journalist Michael Hobbes spend each episode exploring what they call the “wellness-industrial complex,” debunking health fads and nut...
She Wrote the History of ‘Jeopardy!’ Then She Changed It.

She Wrote the History of ‘Jeopardy!’ Then She Changed It.

LifeStyle
Two days before the journalist Claire McNear published her book, which was billed as a “definitive history” of “Jeopardy!,” its beloved host, Alex Trebek, died of pancreatic cancer, thrusting the game show into a period of uncertainty unlike any its staff had ever seen.McNear’s 2020 book, “Answers in the Form of Questions,” had argued that “Jeopardy!,” a television staple that first premiered in 1964, was on the precipice of significant change, with some key figures who had helped shape the show for decades stepping back.But the loss of Trebek in November raised a new existential question for the show: Could “Jeopardy!” continue to be a success without its trusted, even-keeled captain, who had been its face for more than 36 years?For McNear, one of the most critical chapters in the show’s ...
Times Newsletters Director Announces Changes

Times Newsletters Director Announces Changes

Technology
Times Insider explains who we are and what we do, and delivers behind-the-scenes insights into how our journalism comes together.Newsletters have a history even longer than newspapers, and email is several decades older than the web. Despite this lengthy pedigree, email newsletters are having a very buzzy moment — and here at The New York Times, we’re striving to bring even more depth, ambition and scale to our lineup.This summer marks 20 years since The Times published its first newsletters. We started off in 2001 covering technology, books and finance, among other topics. Some of those newsletters are still thriving, in various incarnations, as part of a portfolio that reaches some 15 million people every week — a number that has surged over the last two years. Flagships such as The Morn...
How Local Media Spreads Misinformation From Vaccine Skeptics

How Local Media Spreads Misinformation From Vaccine Skeptics

Technology
One radio show that appears to have been part of that effect is Coast to Coast AM, which is syndicated on 640 local stations and reaches nearly three million weekly listeners. Its host, George Noory, has in recent years interviewed Dr. Tenpenny, Robert Kennedy Jr., a lawyer and anti-vaccine activist, and Erin Elizabeth, the founder of the website Health Nut News and a vaccine skeptic.Understand the State of Vaccine Mandates in the U.S.The activists have used their segments on the show to reinforce their messages. In a promotion for Dr. Tenpenny’s appearance to discuss the coronavirus in April 2020, for example, Coast to Coast AM’s website said, “She contends that there are so many unknowns in regards to testing, tracking, symptoms, and other factors, that the information we’re being told a...
From the Schlump With the Shiv, Two Plays Turned Podcasts

From the Schlump With the Shiv, Two Plays Turned Podcasts

LifeStyle
Shawn now plays Ben, a doctor who has invented a genetically modified nutrient called Grain No. 1. When fed to animals, Grain No. 1 causes them to eat voraciously and reproduce constantly, thus ending the world’s food shortage. But as the effects of this change move up the food chain, Grain No. 1 not only unlocks a “molecular inhibition” with devastating digestive consequences, it unlocks a pandemic of sexual inhibition as well.Though “Grasses” at first seems like a cautionary tale about food science and ecological end times, most of its considerable length — like “The Designated Mourner,” it is broken into six segments of about 30 minutes each — is devoted to that sexual unloosening. Ben’s beloved penis now becomes an almost autonomous creature, and its adventures a kind of Rabelaisian pi...
Joe Rogan Is Too Big to Cancel

Joe Rogan Is Too Big to Cancel

Business
He has appeared to attribute his own popularity to an underserved market, recently recalling the bafflement of advertising professionals over his audience demographics. “They’re like, ‘Jesus Christ, he’s got like 94 percent men. Like, what is going on here?’” Mr. Rogan said in May, probably exaggerating the figure a bit. “I’m like, ‘It’s because they’re not represented. Men are not represented.’”For listeners, the attachment is visceral, communal — a “monoculture of free-thinkers,” as Marc Maron, the fellow podcaster and comedian, has said of the Rogan-inclined masses, tweaking a group that can descend on its targets as an online bloc.Comics say they have become instantly recognizable to new fans as far afield as Australia after appearing on Mr. Rogan’s show. Shanna Swan, a reproductive ep...
Do You Have a Love Story About Being Separated by National Borders?

Do You Have a Love Story About Being Separated by National Borders?

LifeStyle
As the saying goes, “Love knows no bounds.” However, national borders can often hold back lovers and families from being together.The Modern Love Podcast is looking for true stories about relationships that are (or have been) complicated by national boundaries.Have you had to break up with a lover because of immigration policies? Has it been years since you’ve seen a family member on the other side of the world? Has your relationship been challenged by coronavirus travel restrictions? What was it like when you could finally see your partner?Please send a short voice memo (no more than 2 minutes) with your story to modernlovepodcast@nytimes.com. Start by telling us your full name and where you live. And if you can, tell us how your story ended. We may use excerpts from your audio message in...