Friday, October 22News That Matters

Tag: Salmon

In Alaska, the Salmon Catch Hints at the Chaos of Climate Change

In Alaska, the Salmon Catch Hints at the Chaos of Climate Change

LifeStyle
This summer, fishers in the world’s largest wild salmon habitat pulled a record-breaking 65 million sockeye salmon from Alaska’s Bristol Bay, beating the 2018 record by more than three million fish.But on the Yukon River, about 500 miles to the north, salmon were alarmingly absent. This summer’s chum run was the lowest on record, with only 153,000 fish counted in the river at the Pilot Station sonar — a stark contrast to the 1.7 million chum running in year’s past. The king salmon runs were also critically low this summer — the third lowest on record. The Yukon’s fall run is also shaping up to be sparse.The disparity between the fisheries is concerning — a possible bellwether for the chaotic consequences of climate change; competition between wild and hatchery fish; and commercial fishing ...
Like in ‘Postapocalyptic Movies’: Heat Wave Killed Marine Wildlife en Masse

Like in ‘Postapocalyptic Movies’: Heat Wave Killed Marine Wildlife en Masse

Technology, World
Dead mussels and clams coated rocks in the Pacific Northwest, their shells gaping open as if they’d been boiled. Sea stars were baked to death. Sockeye salmon swam sluggishly in an overheated Washington river, prompting wildlife officials to truck them to cooler areas.The combination of extraordinary heat and drought that hit the Western United States and Canada over the past two weeks has killed hundreds of millions of marine animals and continues to threaten untold species in freshwater, according to a preliminary estimate and interviews with scientists.“It just feels like one of those postapocalyptic movies,” said Christopher Harley, a marine biologist at the University of British Columbia who studies the effects of climate change on coastal marine ecosystems. To calculate the death tol...
On the Water in Alaska, Where Salmon Fishing Dreams Live On

On the Water in Alaska, Where Salmon Fishing Dreams Live On

Travel
My camera lens is pressed against the window of the small floatplane as it flies below a thick ceiling of clouds. The mist clings to the hillsides of a temperate rainforest that descend steeply to the rocky coastline of southeast Alaska.The plane banks, and a tiny village comes into view. A scattering of houses are built on stilts on the water’s edge. We circle and I see fishing boats tied up next to a large dock and a floating post office. The pilot throttles down and the pontoons skim across the glassy water inside the bay. We taxi to the public dock and I step out in front of the Point Baker general store.Life along the Alaska coast is economically and culturally dependent on fishing. Each summer, millions of salmon — after maturing in the ocean — begin their journey back to the rivers ...
One Pan, 30 Minutes and a Superior Spring Salmon

One Pan, 30 Minutes and a Superior Spring Salmon

LifeStyle
Of all the ways to cook a sugar snap pea, roasting at high heat was never at the top of my list.To me, the joy of a sugar snap was always in its crunch — that juicy pop when you bit one in half. And that is exactly what a stint in a hot oven would obliterate.Besides, with their season being so frustratingly short in the Northeast, I hardly had enough time to eat my fill of them raw or quickly blanched before they disappeared. Roasting was just not a priority.Eventually, though, I had to try it. After all, I’ve enjoyed roasting pretty much every other vegetable out there. (Even the less obviously roast-able ones, like radishes and lettuces, have their charms.) So I threw a pan of peas into the oven to see what would happen.Visually, the result was not encouraging. The peas wilted, shriveled...
Why That Salmon on Your Plate Might Have Been a Vegetarian

Why That Salmon on Your Plate Might Have Been a Vegetarian

Technology, World
Twenty years ago, as farmed salmon and shrimp started spreading in supermarket freezers, came an influential scientific paper that warned of an environmental mess: Fish farms were gobbling up wild fish stocks, spreading disease and causing marine pollution.This week, some of the same scientists who published that report issued a new paper concluding that fish farming, in many parts of the world, at least, is a whole lot better. The most significant improvement, they said, was that farmed fish were not being fed as much wild fish. They were being fed more plants, like soy.In short, the paper found, farmed fish like salmon and trout had become mostly vegetarians.Synthesizing hundreds of research papers carried out over the last 20 years across the global aquaculture industry, the latest stud...