Tuesday, October 26News That Matters

Tag: Shed (Manhattan, NY)

Very Personal Computing: In Artist’s New Work, A.I. Meets Fatherhood

Very Personal Computing: In Artist’s New Work, A.I. Meets Fatherhood

LifeStyle
Ian Cheng was feeling adrift. It was the start of 2013; he was nearly 30, with an art degree from Berkeley and another from Columbia, but he needed an idea, something to build a career on. Pondering the question one wintry afternoon in the balcony cafe at the Whole Foods Market on Houston Street, a place that promises people-watching and “you time,” he found himself gazing absently at the shoppers below.He grew increasingly transfixed. The market was its own little ecosystem, with clear-cut rules but elements of chance thrown in. Somebody’s dog that wouldn’t behave. A guy sneaking food from the salad bar. People doubling back to get a plate. An idea began to form in Cheng’s head, an idea that drew on his other major at Berkeley, in cognitive science. His thoughts ran to complex systems. Em...
Now You See the Art. Now You Don’t.

Now You See the Art. Now You Don’t.

Technology
On a torrid afternoon in June, Emma Enderby, chief curator of the Shed, and Cecilia Alemani, director and chief curator of High Line Art, walked side by side between their respective bailiwicks on the West Side of Manhattan, plotting the configuration of their first collaborative exhibition.They were exultant.“No night install,” Alemani said. “No cranes. That’s the best.”Nothing would be decided until right before the opening. “We didn’t have to think about engineering or weight loads,” Enderby said. “You can just spend a leisurely day placing them.”The exhibition, “The Looking Glass,” which runs from Saturday through Aug. 29, is a show in which all of “them” — the sculptures on view — are virtual, existing only in augmented reality, or A.R.Using an app developed by Acute Art, a London-bas...
The Art Party Circuit Comes Roaring Back at Frieze New York

The Art Party Circuit Comes Roaring Back at Frieze New York

LifeStyle
Nouriel Roubini, the economist who in 2007 became known as Dr. Doom after predicting the collapse of the housing market, actually sounded ebullient about the future of New York City Tuesday night.“I’m reasonably optimistic,” he said, standing in the cavernous living room of his East Village triplex. “I was walking around my neighborhood this weekend. Every restaurant was open, I hadn’t seen so many people since before Covid.”It was the evening before Frieze New York opened (the first in-person art fair in Manhattan since the start of the pandemic) and Mr. Roubini was hosting a party was for his best friend, Shai Baitel, who in January was named the artistic director of the Modern Art Museum Shanghai.Guests were greeted downstairs by young publicists in masks. Upstairs, Mr. Baitel could be ...
Renée Fleming Was Back Onstage. Here’s What Happened First.

Renée Fleming Was Back Onstage. Here’s What Happened First.

LifeStyle
The soprano Renée Fleming sauntered onstage in a shimmering long-sleeve gown, perched on a chair and started to sing.For a renowned performer decades into her career, it might have been an uneventful Wednesday evening at the Shed, the expansive performance space in Hudson Yards. But after 13 months in a pandemic, a sea of faces was a novel sight for the opera star and the trio accompanying her.“Wow, applause!” she remarked after finishing the meditative opening number. “Very exciting.”Exciting, indeed — and no mean feat to pull off.After the Shed and other flexible New York performance spaces lobbied to let audiences in, it got the go-ahead to open its doors for a live event on April 2, after 386 days of shutdown. Fleming’s April 21 show there, before a limited audience, was the fourth per...
Performing Arts Make a Cautious Return in New York

Performing Arts Make a Cautious Return in New York

LifeStyle
The days are getting longer. The sun is out. The number of vaccinated New Yorkers continues to grow every day.And now, more than a year after the coronavirus pandemic suddenly brought down the curtain at theaters and concert halls across the city, darkening Broadway and comedy clubs alike, the performing arts are beginning to bounce back.Like budding flowers awakening just in time for spring, music, dance, theater and comedy began a cautious return this past week as venues were allowed reopen with limited capacity — in most cases, for the first time since March 2020.But the pandemic remains unwieldy in New York, and across the country. New York City is still a coronavirus hot spot, with new cases holding stubbornly at around 25,000 a week. Alongside a rush to vaccinate, variants persist. A...
Live Performing Arts Are Returning to N.Y.C., but Not All at Once

Live Performing Arts Are Returning to N.Y.C., but Not All at Once

LifeStyle
This is the weekend New York City’s theaters, music venues and comedy clubs have been waiting for. The chance to start holding performances again for a live, flesh-and-blood audience.Last month, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo announced that beginning April 2, performing arts establishments would be allowed to host audiences at 33 percent capacity, with a limit of 100 people indoors or 200 people outdoors.As that date has drawn closer, it became clear that the arts scene will not be springing back to life, but inching toward it. It isn’t just Broadway theaters and large concert halls that see the one-third capacity rule as prohibitive; it’s smaller venues, including some of the city’s foremost jazz and rock clubs, as well.Still, green shoots are sprouting up across the city.On Friday, the monologuist...