Tuesday, November 30News That Matters

Tag: Wall Street Journal

Facebook Profits Jump 17 Percent

Technology
Facebook said on Monday that revenue rose 35 percent to $29 billion in the three months ending in September compared with the same period last year, while profit rose 17 percent to $9.2 billion, a sign of the social network’s financial strength as it faces a public relations crisis over troubling disclosures made by a former employee.Advertising revenue, which is responsible for the vast majority of Facebook’s income, rose 33 percent to $28.3 billion. “Other” revenue, which consists largely of sales of Facebook’s virtual-reality Oculus hardware, rose 195 percent to $734 million.Some 3.6 billion people now use one of Facebook’s apps every month, up 12 percent from a year earlier.“We made good progress this quarter and our community continues to grow,” said Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s founde...
Facebook Is Weaker Than We Knew

Facebook Is Weaker Than We Knew

Technology
It has become fashionable among Facebook critics to emphasize the company’s size and dominance while bashing its missteps. In a Senate hearing on Thursday, lawmakers grilled Antigone Davis, Facebook’s global head of safety, with questions about the company’s addictive product design and the influence it has over its billions of users. Many of the questions to Ms. Davis were hostile, but as with most Big Tech hearings, there was an odd sort of deference in the air, as if the lawmakers were asking: Hey, Godzilla, would you please stop stomping on Tokyo?But if these leaked documents proved anything, it is how un-Godzilla-like Facebook feels. Internally, the company worries that it is losing power and influence, not gaining it, and its own research shows that many of its products aren’t thrivi...
Facebook Struggles to Quell Uproar Over Instagram’s Effect on Teens

Facebook Struggles to Quell Uproar Over Instagram’s Effect on Teens

Technology
SAN FRANCISCO — Over the past few weeks, top Facebook executives assembled virtually for a series of emergency meetings.In one gathering last weekend, half a dozen managers — including Adam Mosseri, head of Instagram, and Nick Clegg, Facebook’s vice president of global affairs — discussed pausing the development of an Instagram service for children ages 13 and under, said two people briefed on the meeting. Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, weighed in to approve the decision, the people said.The meetings continued this week, with a larger group that included Facebook’s “Strategic Response” teams, which are overseen by Mr. Clegg and Sheryl Sandberg, the chief operating officer, the people said. The executives debated what to do about internal research around teenagers and Instagra...
How News Organizations Got Colleagues Out of Kabul, Afghanistan

How News Organizations Got Colleagues Out of Kabul, Afghanistan

Business
As the situation in Afghanistan deteriorated in recent days, the publishers of The Times, The Journal and The Post banded together on their evacuation efforts. Security personnel and editors shared information on morning calls. The publishers called on the Biden administration to help facilitate the passage of their Afghan colleagues, and discussions ensued with officials at the White House, the Pentagon and the State Department.By Sunday, bureaus had been closed and Kabul’s streets had grown chaotic. As American troops, contractors and security teams left the country, newsroom officials had less and less visibility into the situation on the ground. Some Afghan employees feared that Taliban forces would go door to door, intimidating or even kidnapping journalists known to have worked with ...
How News Organizations Got Afghan Colleagues Out of Kabul

How News Organizations Got Afghan Colleagues Out of Kabul

Business
As the situation in Afghanistan deteriorated in recent days, the publishers of The Times, The Journal and The Post banded together on their evacuation efforts. Security personnel and editors shared information on morning calls. The publishers called on the Biden administration to help facilitate the passage of their Afghan colleagues, and discussions ensued with officials at the White House, the Pentagon and the State Department.By Sunday, bureaus had been closed and Kabul’s streets had grown chaotic. As American troops, contractors and security teams left the country, newsroom officials had less and less visibility into the situation on the ground. Some Afghan employees feared that Taliban forces would go door to door, intimidating or even kidnapping journalists known to have worked with ...
Dazzling Skies, U.F.O. Sightings and Real-Life Monsters: The Week in Narrated Articles

Dazzling Skies, U.F.O. Sightings and Real-Life Monsters: The Week in Narrated Articles

Technology
This weekend, listen to a collection of narrated articles from around The New York Times, read aloud by the reporters who wrote the story.Written and narrated by Brooke JarvisAt around 9 o’clock on the night of March 25, the sky above Brooke Jarvis’s house in Seattle lit up with an astonishing display. “It looked like the world’s largest and longest-lasting firework, or a huge shower of comets hitting all at once,” Brooke wrote.People all across the Pacific Northwest were posting videos of the fantastical brightness on Twitter. For a few dazzling moments, they had no idea what they were witnessing, but they shared a once-common human emotion: awe at the wonder of the heavens.◆ ◆ ◆Written and narrated by Sarah Maslin NirIn 2020, New Yorkers reported nearly twice as many sightings of mysteri...
The Wall Street Journal’s Internal Audit

The Wall Street Journal’s Internal Audit

Business
For over a year, a special team of editors within The Wall Street Journal analyzed the state of the newsroom and produced a detailed, lengthy report on what the paper is doing right, and, more important, what the paper is doing wrong.The stakes are high. Subscriptions to The Journal are growing — but not fast enough. News Corp, the company that owns The Journal, wants the broadsheet to double its readership. The study, called The Content Review, concluded that that goal would be difficult without sweeping changes.The Journal, it said, needs to rethink how it gathers news, what kinds of topics it covers and who its audience is. The report was intended to serve as a blueprint for how the paper should remake itself for the digital age and insure its future.But the company has effectively shel...
Inside the Fight for the Future of The Wall Street Journal

Inside the Fight for the Future of The Wall Street Journal

Technology
The Content Review has not been formally shared with the newsroom and its recommendations have not been put into effect, but it is influencing how people work: An impasse over the report has led to a divided newsroom, according to interviews with 25 current and former staff members. The company, they say, has avoided making the proposed changes because a brewing power struggle between Mr. Murray and the new publisher, Almar Latour, has contributed to a stalemate that threatens the future of The Journal.Mr. Murray and Mr. Latour, 50, represent two extremes of the model Murdoch employee. Mr. Murray is the tactful editor; Mr. Latour is the brash entrepreneur. The two rose within the organization at roughly the same time. When the moment came to replace Gerry Baker as the top editor in 2018, b...